Ethics of Alterity, Confrontation and Responsibility in 19th- to 21st-Century British Literature – new volume edited by Christine Reynier and Jean-Michel Ganteau

Christine Reynier and Jean-Michel Ganteau (University Paul Valéry – Montpellier III) have edited over the last few years  a number of wonderful volumes of essays that might be of interest to scholars working at the intersection of literature, philosophy, and the arts: Impersonality and Emotion in Twentieth-Century British Literature (PULM, 2005), Impersonality and Emotion in Twentieth-Century British Arts (PULM, 2007), Autonomy and Commitment in Twentieth-Century British Literature (PULM, 2010), and Autonomy and Commitment in Twentieth-Century British Arts (PULM, 2012). The last in this series was published last year, also by Presses Universitaires de la Méditerranée:

“Over the last few decades, in the wake of the ‘Ethical Turn’, contemporary literature has been examined through the prism of the ethics of alterity. Yet, this may not be consis­tently the case with Victorian and Modernist literature, since relatively few of the authors of those periods have elicited such critical and ­theoretical scrutiny.

The articles in this volume set off to re-read Victorian and Modernist literature in the light of the ethics of alterity and investigate whether the post-Auschwitz, contemporary period breaks away from or favours lines of continuity with the productions of the earlier era. It also strives to address works which do not belong to the canon, focusing alternately on great authors and less known artists, on what has been termed ‘minor’ texts or genres that are less visible than the novel. Approaching literature by examining the relations between ethics and aesthetics, even while adopting an ethical approach, helps the authors in this volume contribute to revising the contemporary, Modernist and Victorian canon in English Literature.”

For the table of contents, please visit the publisher’s page.

 

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